Features

SUPER FARMS Feature

In Features By Kristyn Lak Miller / May 2016

Cultivating Crops and Community That iconic road sign image of a silhouetted farmer sitting atop a tractor needs updating. Today’s farmer most likely has a smart phone in one hand, a cup of coffee in the other, and is juggling multiple tasks: managing payroll, taking pictures for a blog, organizing events, not to mention tending the crops and livestock.

The Joy of Java

In Features By Diane Blair and Pamela Wright / February 2016

On the trail for the perfect cup We love our coffee. According to a recent survey conducted by the National Coffee Association, about 83 percent of adults drink coffee in the U.S., the world’s biggest consumer of the beverage. That’s an average of three cups a day per person, some 587 million cups consumed daily from coast to coast. But it’s more than just a shot of caffeine that we crave. Going out for coffee has become an affordable indulgence and a well-earned ritual that provides comfort and camaraderie. No wonder there's been an influx of coffeehouses on the Seacoast.

The Whole Truth

In Features By Christine Burns Rudalevige/Photos: Richard Dumont / September 2016

New Way Old Way to Cut Meat Dennis Belleville of Carl’s Meat Market in Kittery, Maine, remembers the first box of beef that came into the store. It was around 1979, when the shop was on Government Street. He recalls there being probably seven meat cutters standing around. Staring at it. Poking it. Opening the cardboard first, and then the plastic bag inside. All the pieces were the same. “It was space age meat to us at the time,” he says.

What Fishermen Eat (and why) Feature

In Features By Christine Burns Rudalevige & Mollie Sanders / June 2015

Some of the best fish rarely make it to our tables – but they should. Seacoast fisherman Erik Anderson has been harvesting seafood from Gulf of Maine waters for over 40 years. His considerable tenure at sea—most recently focusing on pulling lobsters aboard his vessel, the Kris ’n’ Kev, which he lands in Portsmouth Harbor—has certainly not spoiled his taste for all kinds of fish. In fact, the opposite is true.